October 31, 2014

Trek Hound Travel Uses for the Classic Bandana

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Flickr Photo Credit: Celebdu

During a previous budget ideas post I did for Wise Bread, fellow blogger Nora Dunn joined the discussion and pointed out just how versatile an item the humble bandana is on the road. So I got to thinking. Just how much mileage could I get out of one of these things? Following is my list of suggestions.

  • Luggage ID. With a bright colored bandana tied to the handle, even the most ordinary piece of baggage can be spotted in a jiffy on the luggage carousel.

  • Crowd location device. If you are wanting a group of people or a travel partner to be able to find you in a hurry, either wear a brightly colored one, or tie it to an umbrella or walking stick to be able to hold high in the air. Tour guides would find this tip useful as well.

  • Face cloth. Why carry a thicker, more difficult to dry one in your pack taking up space when these work just as well and store much more compactly?

  • Dust storm protection. Larger ones can be tied around your nose and mouth to filter out dust. Anyone who has traveled to certain regions of Cambodia during the dry season will know exactly what Iím talking about.

  • Emergency maxi pad. Actually, I tend to carry a few cloth ones for emergencies while on the road, along with other alternative feminine products with an eco twist. However, if you are caught unawares or are out for a low baggage jaunt without your day pack, take it off your hair and fold into a multi layered rectangle to tuck where it needs to be tucked. Youíll have to tread carefully to avoid dislodging, but itís better than nothing. Trust me.

  • Bandage on the fly. You never know when adversity will strike. If you have an unsoiled one in your bag, youíll be good to go.

  • The in-between-showers head scarf. Only have access to a sink or baby wipes for a few days? Go Bohemian. Wrap your locks in a bandana. Covers up the stringy hair and gives you a fresher overall look until you have access to a shower once again.

  • Miniature picnic cloth. OK, you canít sit on these and have room for food. But it will give you a small work space off the ground to sit in the park and spread out some crackers and such. Give it a whirl.

Another cool link I just found? This one from JourneyWoman.Com. She really takes the bandana brainstorming to an entirely new level including one use I could have put to use on our around the world adventure: a dish rag. Also, hereís another great link to a page with instructions for sewing a hidden pocket into your wearable travel bandana. Great for security! If you have other awesome ideas on traveling bandana uses, chime in with a comment.